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Trip to Hyderabad

Last week we went by plane to Hyderabad, to explore the origin of Malkha, a unique cotton fabric that is produced in South India (find more via http://www.malkha.in/). Our main goal was to find out if the Malkha fabric is suitable for the Banana Republics Heritage Collection. We looked at weaving structures and colour variety, quality, quantity and cost prices as well as social and environmental responsibility.

We arrived on a Sunday morning. Since we had a free schedule we decided to start our stay with a typical South Indian breakfast, which turned out to be had a very heavy. After some rest in our nice Hotel rooms we couldn’t wait to explore the city and do some sightseeing. First we went to the Salar Jung Museum. Followed by a visit of a mosque in the centre called Charminar, which is Hyderabad’s main attraction. The last attraction on our list was Birla Mandir a Hindu Temple entirely built in white marble. 

The next day we had to get up early to visit a spinning and weaving unit of Malkha, which was two hours away from Hyderabad. We first saw the whole weaving process, from yarn to cloth. About ten women work in the weaving section of this small-scale production place. Just to give an example, average daily outcomes are 3 meters of plain cotton per Handloom per day. Next the weaving the actual fabric the spinning process of the used yarns takes place in the same building to reduce lead-times & transportation ways. For us it was nice to learn about Handloom production and the villagers integrate their work into their family life.

In the afternoon we got the chance the visit Malkhas head office and meet Uzramma the founder and principal of the NGO. She, a very ambitions and inspiring woman introduced us to the Malkha story and answered our question concerning the use of Malkha in our Banana Republic collection.

On Tuesday morning we visited the office of Dastkar, an organisation for crafts and craftspeople in India (http://www.dastkar.org/organisationalmap.htm). Later that day we went to a place outside the city to a place where yarns for Malkha fabrics where dyed. All yarns are coloured with natural dyestuff.


Wednesday it was time for us to see the how cotton grows for real. Our Gap mentor organised a visit of an organic cotton field where cotton grows next to other plants such as corn, to protect the fields in the long-term view. The very long car drive was definitely worth this experience. We were all curious about the many stories the farmers had to tell. Now we have way better understanding about sourcing of organic cotton.

Thursday was already our final day. We had the whole day off so we decided to go to the centre of Hyderabad to explore local markets and enjoy the way Indians trade and bargain.

At 17:00 pm it was time for us to get back to the airport and catch our flight to Delhi again.

We had a warm welcome in Hyderabad today! People welcomed us as true pop stars; photo’s, hand shakes and video’s included.

We had a warm welcome in Hyderabad today! People welcomed us as true pop stars; photo’s, hand shakes and video’s included.

Dilli Haat Market

Dilli Haat Market

Visit to Crafts Museum

Today one of our Indian tutors, Ma’am Jolly, took us to visit the Crafts Museum.In the outside area of the museum we saw the village complex, which is a remnant of an exhibition on the theme of rural India, in 1972. Huts and courtyards from states like Orissa, Rajasthan, Gujarat and Arunachal Pradesh were rebuilt using the typical regional construction materials.

Some of the huts, depending on the region, were beautifully decorated with colourful wall paintings.

 

After exploring the village complex we went to see craftsmen who showed us how they made various products, not only cloth but also paper- and sketch-art. It gave us a great impression of the tradition and culture of rural India.


Inside the museum there also were several exhibitions, we chose to see the exhibition of cloths and garments from all the different countries of the Commonwealth, specially set up for the Commonwealth Games.

 Cloths and garments from influential people like Nelson Mandela and Gandhi were displayed, next to distinctive pieces worn by presidents from Nigeria and Ghana, the Queen of England and some characterizing cloth from Canada and Australia.

 

Indian Fashion Designers

One of the lessons we followed on Pearl academy of fashion was Indian fashion industry. The teacher explained us a short history of Indian designers.

The existence of  fashion design starts in 1991 with Rohit khosla. This is a list of the first designers in India.

 

Rohit Khosla (1958-1994)

  • Rohit is the first Indian designer, he promoted up coming models.
  • He co-founded Ensemble, India’s popular designer label store. 
  • Rohini Khosla published a book on his life and work, titled, “Rohit Khosla’’

 

 

 

Ritu Kumar

  • Ritu promoted Indian crafts and textiles by making it commercial.
  • Kumar co-authored a book “Costumes and Textiles of Royal India” 

 

 

 

J.J. Valaya

  • In 1992 he launched his couture label J.J. Valaya.
  • J.J. Valaya contends bridal and special occasion wear.
  •  His focus is on the middle east and Indian market.

 

  

Rohit Bal

  • Designer in haute couture and ready to wear for men and women.
  • He promoted the fabric Kadhi.

 

 

 

Manish Malhotra

  • Bollywood costume designer.

 

 

Manish Arora

  • In 1997 he launched the label Manish Arora and started retailing in India.
  • In 2000 Manish showed his first ready to wear collection at India Fashion Week in Delhi.
  • His style is a mix of Indian pop art, punk and grunge.
  • Manish has a partnership with the sport brand Reebok.

Visit to Satya Jyoti

After a view days at Pearl Academy, a couple of students and a tutor took us to a very special NGO just outside the city. We left New Delhi in the early morning and when we arrived at the farm a lovely Indian breakfast was served. After the breakfast the initiator of the project, Kakoli Banerjee, took us to a nice rooftop and introduced us to this special project. She started with a short meditation and after that Kakoli told us more about the community.

 

Satya Jyoti is a farm that gives women that had a hard life before the change to have a better life after all. In which they can earn their own money, educate their children and life in a secure housing and warm community. This group of women takes care of their own food, both agricultural and the actual processing to food. Besides that, these women all work together on an organic clothing line. Kakoli takes care of the design and these high end ready to wear pieces are being sold in Satya Jyoti’s own store in Gurgaon (a satellite city on the south of New Delhi) and at Numanu-Label of Love, a fair trade store in Paris.

 

Kakoli Banerjee feels responsible for the community and besides that, the women feel responsible for each other. There is no competition, no stress and no fear. Everybody in the community can live their life on a sustainable way and this provides the perfect atmosphere. In which creativity grows and people amplify.

 

After the inspirational introduction, a local community worker showed us around the area. The garments are being produced in their own small sewing centre, all by hand. We saw some wonderful pieces of cloth being made! Not only the women work in this sewing centre, also smaller girls are working here. They are living in the community because of the same reason as the older women; their life before was not liveable and at Satya Jyoti, they get a chance to learn and develop.

But, a lot more happens inside this gated property! Vegetables are growing in greenhouses, trees full of different fruits are waiting to be harvest and the women (sometimes with their husband) are all living in their own cottages. The food that is produced is processed in a common kitchen where the community works and eats together.

Just like they come together everyday, we ended ours with a delicious meal!

Check http://www.satya-jyoti.com/ for more info.

Dutch Design Fashion Architecture supports this wonderful project. Their financial support makes it possible for us to do this project and to help the DDFA in their research on India.

The turbulent growth of India’s economy has led to a significant shift in how the country is perceived within a short amount of time – both within India itself, but certainly also elsewhere. Although not all parts of the country, and certainly not all layers of its population benefit equally from its growing welfare, progress is visible through factors such as increase in income, expansion of the real estate market, the job market and for instance the growth of the retail sector.

Research in the architecture, fashion and design sectors all seems to point in the same direction: Dutch designers, and specifically those agencies with a strong, professional work method, will mainly be able to get a foot in the door through collaboration with Indian partners. Indian companies here have a clear goal: they want to professionalise and (eventually) internationalise their own design practices through their partners.


Take a look at the website of DDFA; http://www.dutchdfa.nl/

Dutch Design Fashion Architecture supports this wonderful project. Their financial support makes it possible for us to do this project and to help the DDFA in their research on India.

The turbulent growth of India’s economy has led to a significant shift in how the country is perceived within a short amount of time – both within India itself, but certainly also elsewhere. Although not all parts of the country, and certainly not all layers of its population benefit equally from its growing welfare, progress is visible through factors such as increase in income, expansion of the real estate market, the job market and for instance the growth of the retail sector.

Research in the architecture, fashion and design sectors all seems to point in the same direction: Dutch designers, and specifically those agencies with a strong, professional work method, will mainly be able to get a foot in the door through collaboration with Indian partners. Indian companies here have a clear goal: they want to professionalise and (eventually) internationalise their own design practices through their partners.

Take a look at the website of DDFA; http://www.dutchdfa.nl/

DLF Emporio

Today eleven students from Pearl Academy took us to the DLF Emporio. This is a luxurious shopping mall in Vasant Kunj, (New Delhi). The meaning of this visit was to recognize the differences between fashion in India and the EU in terms of colour, techniques, shapes and styles. The interior style of the building looked very classic and luxurious.

At the ground floor we found brands like: Dior, Versace, Fendi and Emporio Armani. It seems to us that the collections were a little bit more colourful, glamorous, classic and “Italian” in terms of style than in the EU. This was also the case at the first floor, with brands like: DKNY, Just Cavalli and Marc by Marc Jacobs. At the second floor we have seen especially young Indian brands like: Rohit Bal, JJ Valaya, Neeru Kumar and Gaurav Gupta. The last mentioned designer happened to be present in his own shop, so that was a pleasant surprise. The most collections we have seen here had a fusion of Indian traditional design with contemporary modern designs. So we have seen traditional silhouettes in sober colours, and humoristic embroidery’s of bicycle rickshaws. Still the collections looked very detailed with a lot of embroidery work and colours. The third floor had a variety of extravagant Indian labels like: Manish Arora, Ogaan and Kimaya. At this floor we have seen a lot of special occasion garments and bridal wear. Most garments had very rich hand embroidery’s and a lot of gold and silver tones were used. Material such as velvet and colours like yellow, dark blue and red gave a very classic feeling. Especially in bridal wear the differences of colour use and embellishments between India and the EU were very big.

Our first days in Delhi

After 19 hours of travelling we finally arrived in Delhi. It’s one o’clock in the morning, very hot & humid.  A small, friendly Indian guy called Gauruv was waiting, to bring us safely to our guesthouse. Three double bedrooms with air-condition, wi-fi & no windows to the outside will be our home for the next four months.

 

During our first days in Delhi we explored our neighbourhood, walked around through street markets, got surprised by a real monsoon rain, brought metro tickets and sim-cards for our mobile phones, got scared by the very hectic and chaotic traffic, learned how to get a rickshaw and barging a fair price, meet some teachers and students a the Pearl Academy and of course had our first Indian dinner.


Yesterday, Sunday the 19th of September, we were invited to a BBQ at the Dutch embassy. It was an opportunity for us to meet & greet with Dutch people living in or around Delhi. To me it felt like a small piece of another world, which isolated from the loud, hectic and polluted urban city.

The people we met were open and keen to get to know, help & advise us. Our first new friendships and business relations were settled.

 

Our first day at school started as Indian as it can be. After toast, jam and coffee we walked to the next big street to find two auto-rickshaws that will bring us to school. Which turned out was not very easy during pear hours. A seminar about the Indian culture started an half-hour later because of the traffic chaos the monsoon rain had caused in the early morning. After a lunch break we all got dressed up in very beautiful, traditionally handmade garments from all parts of India, to get a better idea, what Indian handcraft in about.

 

 

Today we will visit Satya Jyoti outside of Delhi. You will find a post on this blog after our visit!

Here we go! Our first day in New Delhi was already a big experience. After lots of people, traffic, sun, waiting and more waiting we now have our metro passes, cash money and sim-cards! 

Here we go! Our first day in New Delhi was already a big experience. After lots of people, traffic, sun, waiting and more waiting we now have our metro passes, cash money and sim-cards! 

Traditional Dutch Costumes

Volendam 

Its main features is the ”Volendammer hul” is worn on the head, and red coral necklaces, consisting of three rows of thick red coral with a golden closure.

Marken

Typical of the Marker costume includes the ”rijglijf”, a corset, decorated with embroidery. The “Bauw” is special: this is a nice little piece printed fabric, that is worn on the chest. Especially on Sundays and public holidays they often wear very beautiful, antique pieces of fabric.

Bunschoten-Spakenburg-Eemdijk

Striking are the big tight starched ”kraplappen”, worn as a kind of shield on the chest and schoulders. They are often made of beautiful printed cotton, the ”kraplap” is kept in model with a lot of starch. Also unique are the crocheted hats like in Marken the ”bauwen” are on Sundays and public holidays are often made of vintage fabric. During the grief the ”bauwen” are very colourful, in the light mourning they usually show light purple floral motifs on a white background. In the heavier mourning dominates the dark purple.

Staphorst-Rouveen

The women wear a “borststuk” of mostly black fabric, where only the sleeves are visible. The ”kraplap” is worn over the ‘’borststuk’’ which is almost always decorated with floral motifs.

During grief the cloths are very colourful, in light mourning the the colours are mainly blue, green, purple. In deep mourning the flower or dot patterns are black and white. Over this is worn a plaid cotton shoulder cloth: red with white and blue as they are not in mourning, blue and black for the mourning period.

The skirt is usually black with strong pleats at the back. A ”schort” is worn on top of the skirt with a coloured upper part.
On the head wearing a cap of cotton with ”stipwerk”. On Sunday and on special occasions, the large silver ”oorijzer” is worn with golden curls.

Zuid-Beveland

The Zuid-Beveland costume is one of the finest and most expensive ones in the Netherlands. Most famous are the large lace caps, oval for Protestant women and for Catholic the shape is trapezoidal. The ”oorijzer” is silver, with two golden square “pieces” places on both sides of the face.

Our first publication! We have been mentioned in the latest version of Havana Magazine, the magazine of the Hogeschool van Amsterdam.
Content is a bit outdated, but that is what happens since the program is flexible!
Read the whole magazine here; http://www.havanaweb.nl/archief/jaargang_16/havana04_16.pdf

Our first publication! We have been mentioned in the latest version of Havana Magazine, the magazine of the Hogeschool van Amsterdam.

Content is a bit outdated, but that is what happens since the program is flexible!

Read the whole magazine here; http://www.havanaweb.nl/archief/jaargang_16/havana04_16.pdf

"Fashion codes" of India

How does Indian fashion evolve regarding the globalisation?

According to the books and articles we have read so far. Indian fashion shows a very interesting non-verbal communication. Indian people can get a lot of information just by looking at the appearance of each other. It looks to us like Indian fashion has its own language like a “code” that symbolizes who they are. For example: certain colours will tell about a woman that she is a widow. And shades of green represent the rain season. In Holland these signs and symbols mostly disappeared out of the daily life. That is why we wonder to what extent Indian fashion keeps its traditions. In terms of appearances, like silhouette and colour, but also crafts.

Does globalisation have a big impact on this and will designers eventually focus on the western market, or will Indian Fashion keep its traditional look?

Our main goal is to learn about their rich traditional design culture and look for opportunities to blend them with the Dutch fashion mentality.

These are a few examples of “fashion codes” we find interesting. This is what we might use, during our research.

 

Colours tell a story

Colour card of India

Married woman yellow= kachcha

Appearances tell where you come from women from Rajasthan

A curly moustache stands for masculinity

Aim of the project

India has become a major player in the world of fashion and textiles over the last few years. The country is now the second largest cotton exporter of the world, after China. India is also known for its Crafts industry and is, besides that, a production country for many big fashion brands, for example Nike, GAP and H&M.

AMFI has several reasons for collaborating with India. First of all the school wants to bring its young fashion professionals in contact with the Indian way of working. This will help them in their future career to do business with and for India, either for an Indian or non-Indian fashion company.

Secondly, the fashion industry of India is for a big part based on tradition and heritage (especially the crafts industry). The Dutch students might bring this aspect back in the Dutch way of working, which can lead to innovation, inspiration and new ideas.

AMFI will research the role of tradition in India, what is the Indian perspective of the their own fashion industry? Is there a special need for them to work together with Dutch students and in which area?

The aim of AMFI is to establish a relevant, regular education program with the Pearl Academy (www.pearlacademy.com) and the Crafts industry for Dutch fashion students in India and the other way around. Important is that there will be an exchange of knowledge. Collaboration is a big advantage for Dutch students, but Indian students get the chance to learn from the Dutch students at the same time. It’s a win-win situation.

We as students are looking forward to this project. Besides all reasons mentioned above, the project also contributes to our personal development.

Join our facebook group for instant updates!
Link

Join our facebook group for instant updates!

Link

Trip to Hyderabad

Last week we went by plane to Hyderabad, to explore the origin of Malkha, a unique cotton fabric that is produced in South India (find more via http://www.malkha.in/). Our main goal was to find out if the Malkha fabric is suitable for the Banana Republics Heritage Collection. We looked at weaving structures and colour variety, quality, quantity and cost prices as well as social and environmental responsibility.

We arrived on a Sunday morning. Since we had a free schedule we decided to start our stay with a typical South Indian breakfast, which turned out to be had a very heavy. After some rest in our nice Hotel rooms we couldn’t wait to explore the city and do some sightseeing. First we went to the Salar Jung Museum. Followed by a visit of a mosque in the centre called Charminar, which is Hyderabad’s main attraction. The last attraction on our list was Birla Mandir a Hindu Temple entirely built in white marble. 

The next day we had to get up early to visit a spinning and weaving unit of Malkha, which was two hours away from Hyderabad. We first saw the whole weaving process, from yarn to cloth. About ten women work in the weaving section of this small-scale production place. Just to give an example, average daily outcomes are 3 meters of plain cotton per Handloom per day. Next the weaving the actual fabric the spinning process of the used yarns takes place in the same building to reduce lead-times & transportation ways. For us it was nice to learn about Handloom production and the villagers integrate their work into their family life.

In the afternoon we got the chance the visit Malkhas head office and meet Uzramma the founder and principal of the NGO. She, a very ambitions and inspiring woman introduced us to the Malkha story and answered our question concerning the use of Malkha in our Banana Republic collection.

On Tuesday morning we visited the office of Dastkar, an organisation for crafts and craftspeople in India (http://www.dastkar.org/organisationalmap.htm). Later that day we went to a place outside the city to a place where yarns for Malkha fabrics where dyed. All yarns are coloured with natural dyestuff.


Wednesday it was time for us to see the how cotton grows for real. Our Gap mentor organised a visit of an organic cotton field where cotton grows next to other plants such as corn, to protect the fields in the long-term view. The very long car drive was definitely worth this experience. We were all curious about the many stories the farmers had to tell. Now we have way better understanding about sourcing of organic cotton.

Thursday was already our final day. We had the whole day off so we decided to go to the centre of Hyderabad to explore local markets and enjoy the way Indians trade and bargain.

At 17:00 pm it was time for us to get back to the airport and catch our flight to Delhi again.

We had a warm welcome in Hyderabad today! People welcomed us as true pop stars; photo’s, hand shakes and video’s included.

We had a warm welcome in Hyderabad today! People welcomed us as true pop stars; photo’s, hand shakes and video’s included.

Dilli Haat Market

Dilli Haat Market

Visit to Crafts Museum

Today one of our Indian tutors, Ma’am Jolly, took us to visit the Crafts Museum.In the outside area of the museum we saw the village complex, which is a remnant of an exhibition on the theme of rural India, in 1972. Huts and courtyards from states like Orissa, Rajasthan, Gujarat and Arunachal Pradesh were rebuilt using the typical regional construction materials.

Some of the huts, depending on the region, were beautifully decorated with colourful wall paintings.

 

After exploring the village complex we went to see craftsmen who showed us how they made various products, not only cloth but also paper- and sketch-art. It gave us a great impression of the tradition and culture of rural India.


Inside the museum there also were several exhibitions, we chose to see the exhibition of cloths and garments from all the different countries of the Commonwealth, specially set up for the Commonwealth Games.

 Cloths and garments from influential people like Nelson Mandela and Gandhi were displayed, next to distinctive pieces worn by presidents from Nigeria and Ghana, the Queen of England and some characterizing cloth from Canada and Australia.

 

Indian Fashion Designers

One of the lessons we followed on Pearl academy of fashion was Indian fashion industry. The teacher explained us a short history of Indian designers.

The existence of  fashion design starts in 1991 with Rohit khosla. This is a list of the first designers in India.

 

Rohit Khosla (1958-1994)

  • Rohit is the first Indian designer, he promoted up coming models.
  • He co-founded Ensemble, India’s popular designer label store. 
  • Rohini Khosla published a book on his life and work, titled, “Rohit Khosla’’

 

 

 

Ritu Kumar

  • Ritu promoted Indian crafts and textiles by making it commercial.
  • Kumar co-authored a book “Costumes and Textiles of Royal India” 

 

 

 

J.J. Valaya

  • In 1992 he launched his couture label J.J. Valaya.
  • J.J. Valaya contends bridal and special occasion wear.
  •  His focus is on the middle east and Indian market.

 

  

Rohit Bal

  • Designer in haute couture and ready to wear for men and women.
  • He promoted the fabric Kadhi.

 

 

 

Manish Malhotra

  • Bollywood costume designer.

 

 

Manish Arora

  • In 1997 he launched the label Manish Arora and started retailing in India.
  • In 2000 Manish showed his first ready to wear collection at India Fashion Week in Delhi.
  • His style is a mix of Indian pop art, punk and grunge.
  • Manish has a partnership with the sport brand Reebok.

Visit to Satya Jyoti

After a view days at Pearl Academy, a couple of students and a tutor took us to a very special NGO just outside the city. We left New Delhi in the early morning and when we arrived at the farm a lovely Indian breakfast was served. After the breakfast the initiator of the project, Kakoli Banerjee, took us to a nice rooftop and introduced us to this special project. She started with a short meditation and after that Kakoli told us more about the community.

 

Satya Jyoti is a farm that gives women that had a hard life before the change to have a better life after all. In which they can earn their own money, educate their children and life in a secure housing and warm community. This group of women takes care of their own food, both agricultural and the actual processing to food. Besides that, these women all work together on an organic clothing line. Kakoli takes care of the design and these high end ready to wear pieces are being sold in Satya Jyoti’s own store in Gurgaon (a satellite city on the south of New Delhi) and at Numanu-Label of Love, a fair trade store in Paris.

 

Kakoli Banerjee feels responsible for the community and besides that, the women feel responsible for each other. There is no competition, no stress and no fear. Everybody in the community can live their life on a sustainable way and this provides the perfect atmosphere. In which creativity grows and people amplify.

 

After the inspirational introduction, a local community worker showed us around the area. The garments are being produced in their own small sewing centre, all by hand. We saw some wonderful pieces of cloth being made! Not only the women work in this sewing centre, also smaller girls are working here. They are living in the community because of the same reason as the older women; their life before was not liveable and at Satya Jyoti, they get a chance to learn and develop.

But, a lot more happens inside this gated property! Vegetables are growing in greenhouses, trees full of different fruits are waiting to be harvest and the women (sometimes with their husband) are all living in their own cottages. The food that is produced is processed in a common kitchen where the community works and eats together.

Just like they come together everyday, we ended ours with a delicious meal!

Check http://www.satya-jyoti.com/ for more info.

Dutch Design Fashion Architecture supports this wonderful project. Their financial support makes it possible for us to do this project and to help the DDFA in their research on India.

The turbulent growth of India’s economy has led to a significant shift in how the country is perceived within a short amount of time – both within India itself, but certainly also elsewhere. Although not all parts of the country, and certainly not all layers of its population benefit equally from its growing welfare, progress is visible through factors such as increase in income, expansion of the real estate market, the job market and for instance the growth of the retail sector.

Research in the architecture, fashion and design sectors all seems to point in the same direction: Dutch designers, and specifically those agencies with a strong, professional work method, will mainly be able to get a foot in the door through collaboration with Indian partners. Indian companies here have a clear goal: they want to professionalise and (eventually) internationalise their own design practices through their partners.


Take a look at the website of DDFA; http://www.dutchdfa.nl/

Dutch Design Fashion Architecture supports this wonderful project. Their financial support makes it possible for us to do this project and to help the DDFA in their research on India.

The turbulent growth of India’s economy has led to a significant shift in how the country is perceived within a short amount of time – both within India itself, but certainly also elsewhere. Although not all parts of the country, and certainly not all layers of its population benefit equally from its growing welfare, progress is visible through factors such as increase in income, expansion of the real estate market, the job market and for instance the growth of the retail sector.

Research in the architecture, fashion and design sectors all seems to point in the same direction: Dutch designers, and specifically those agencies with a strong, professional work method, will mainly be able to get a foot in the door through collaboration with Indian partners. Indian companies here have a clear goal: they want to professionalise and (eventually) internationalise their own design practices through their partners.

Take a look at the website of DDFA; http://www.dutchdfa.nl/

DLF Emporio

Today eleven students from Pearl Academy took us to the DLF Emporio. This is a luxurious shopping mall in Vasant Kunj, (New Delhi). The meaning of this visit was to recognize the differences between fashion in India and the EU in terms of colour, techniques, shapes and styles. The interior style of the building looked very classic and luxurious.

At the ground floor we found brands like: Dior, Versace, Fendi and Emporio Armani. It seems to us that the collections were a little bit more colourful, glamorous, classic and “Italian” in terms of style than in the EU. This was also the case at the first floor, with brands like: DKNY, Just Cavalli and Marc by Marc Jacobs. At the second floor we have seen especially young Indian brands like: Rohit Bal, JJ Valaya, Neeru Kumar and Gaurav Gupta. The last mentioned designer happened to be present in his own shop, so that was a pleasant surprise. The most collections we have seen here had a fusion of Indian traditional design with contemporary modern designs. So we have seen traditional silhouettes in sober colours, and humoristic embroidery’s of bicycle rickshaws. Still the collections looked very detailed with a lot of embroidery work and colours. The third floor had a variety of extravagant Indian labels like: Manish Arora, Ogaan and Kimaya. At this floor we have seen a lot of special occasion garments and bridal wear. Most garments had very rich hand embroidery’s and a lot of gold and silver tones were used. Material such as velvet and colours like yellow, dark blue and red gave a very classic feeling. Especially in bridal wear the differences of colour use and embellishments between India and the EU were very big.

Our first days in Delhi

After 19 hours of travelling we finally arrived in Delhi. It’s one o’clock in the morning, very hot & humid.  A small, friendly Indian guy called Gauruv was waiting, to bring us safely to our guesthouse. Three double bedrooms with air-condition, wi-fi & no windows to the outside will be our home for the next four months.

 

During our first days in Delhi we explored our neighbourhood, walked around through street markets, got surprised by a real monsoon rain, brought metro tickets and sim-cards for our mobile phones, got scared by the very hectic and chaotic traffic, learned how to get a rickshaw and barging a fair price, meet some teachers and students a the Pearl Academy and of course had our first Indian dinner.


Yesterday, Sunday the 19th of September, we were invited to a BBQ at the Dutch embassy. It was an opportunity for us to meet & greet with Dutch people living in or around Delhi. To me it felt like a small piece of another world, which isolated from the loud, hectic and polluted urban city.

The people we met were open and keen to get to know, help & advise us. Our first new friendships and business relations were settled.

 

Our first day at school started as Indian as it can be. After toast, jam and coffee we walked to the next big street to find two auto-rickshaws that will bring us to school. Which turned out was not very easy during pear hours. A seminar about the Indian culture started an half-hour later because of the traffic chaos the monsoon rain had caused in the early morning. After a lunch break we all got dressed up in very beautiful, traditionally handmade garments from all parts of India, to get a better idea, what Indian handcraft in about.

 

 

Today we will visit Satya Jyoti outside of Delhi. You will find a post on this blog after our visit!

Here we go! Our first day in New Delhi was already a big experience. After lots of people, traffic, sun, waiting and more waiting we now have our metro passes, cash money and sim-cards! 

Here we go! Our first day in New Delhi was already a big experience. After lots of people, traffic, sun, waiting and more waiting we now have our metro passes, cash money and sim-cards! 

Traditional Dutch Costumes

Volendam 

Its main features is the ”Volendammer hul” is worn on the head, and red coral necklaces, consisting of three rows of thick red coral with a golden closure.

Marken

Typical of the Marker costume includes the ”rijglijf”, a corset, decorated with embroidery. The “Bauw” is special: this is a nice little piece printed fabric, that is worn on the chest. Especially on Sundays and public holidays they often wear very beautiful, antique pieces of fabric.

Bunschoten-Spakenburg-Eemdijk

Striking are the big tight starched ”kraplappen”, worn as a kind of shield on the chest and schoulders. They are often made of beautiful printed cotton, the ”kraplap” is kept in model with a lot of starch. Also unique are the crocheted hats like in Marken the ”bauwen” are on Sundays and public holidays are often made of vintage fabric. During the grief the ”bauwen” are very colourful, in the light mourning they usually show light purple floral motifs on a white background. In the heavier mourning dominates the dark purple.

Staphorst-Rouveen

The women wear a “borststuk” of mostly black fabric, where only the sleeves are visible. The ”kraplap” is worn over the ‘’borststuk’’ which is almost always decorated with floral motifs.

During grief the cloths are very colourful, in light mourning the the colours are mainly blue, green, purple. In deep mourning the flower or dot patterns are black and white. Over this is worn a plaid cotton shoulder cloth: red with white and blue as they are not in mourning, blue and black for the mourning period.

The skirt is usually black with strong pleats at the back. A ”schort” is worn on top of the skirt with a coloured upper part.
On the head wearing a cap of cotton with ”stipwerk”. On Sunday and on special occasions, the large silver ”oorijzer” is worn with golden curls.

Zuid-Beveland

The Zuid-Beveland costume is one of the finest and most expensive ones in the Netherlands. Most famous are the large lace caps, oval for Protestant women and for Catholic the shape is trapezoidal. The ”oorijzer” is silver, with two golden square “pieces” places on both sides of the face.

Our first publication! We have been mentioned in the latest version of Havana Magazine, the magazine of the Hogeschool van Amsterdam.
Content is a bit outdated, but that is what happens since the program is flexible!
Read the whole magazine here; http://www.havanaweb.nl/archief/jaargang_16/havana04_16.pdf

Our first publication! We have been mentioned in the latest version of Havana Magazine, the magazine of the Hogeschool van Amsterdam.

Content is a bit outdated, but that is what happens since the program is flexible!

Read the whole magazine here; http://www.havanaweb.nl/archief/jaargang_16/havana04_16.pdf

"Fashion codes" of India

How does Indian fashion evolve regarding the globalisation?

According to the books and articles we have read so far. Indian fashion shows a very interesting non-verbal communication. Indian people can get a lot of information just by looking at the appearance of each other. It looks to us like Indian fashion has its own language like a “code” that symbolizes who they are. For example: certain colours will tell about a woman that she is a widow. And shades of green represent the rain season. In Holland these signs and symbols mostly disappeared out of the daily life. That is why we wonder to what extent Indian fashion keeps its traditions. In terms of appearances, like silhouette and colour, but also crafts.

Does globalisation have a big impact on this and will designers eventually focus on the western market, or will Indian Fashion keep its traditional look?

Our main goal is to learn about their rich traditional design culture and look for opportunities to blend them with the Dutch fashion mentality.

These are a few examples of “fashion codes” we find interesting. This is what we might use, during our research.

 

Colours tell a story

Colour card of India

Married woman yellow= kachcha

Appearances tell where you come from women from Rajasthan

A curly moustache stands for masculinity

Aim of the project

India has become a major player in the world of fashion and textiles over the last few years. The country is now the second largest cotton exporter of the world, after China. India is also known for its Crafts industry and is, besides that, a production country for many big fashion brands, for example Nike, GAP and H&M.

AMFI has several reasons for collaborating with India. First of all the school wants to bring its young fashion professionals in contact with the Indian way of working. This will help them in their future career to do business with and for India, either for an Indian or non-Indian fashion company.

Secondly, the fashion industry of India is for a big part based on tradition and heritage (especially the crafts industry). The Dutch students might bring this aspect back in the Dutch way of working, which can lead to innovation, inspiration and new ideas.

AMFI will research the role of tradition in India, what is the Indian perspective of the their own fashion industry? Is there a special need for them to work together with Dutch students and in which area?

The aim of AMFI is to establish a relevant, regular education program with the Pearl Academy (www.pearlacademy.com) and the Crafts industry for Dutch fashion students in India and the other way around. Important is that there will be an exchange of knowledge. Collaboration is a big advantage for Dutch students, but Indian students get the chance to learn from the Dutch students at the same time. It’s a win-win situation.

We as students are looking forward to this project. Besides all reasons mentioned above, the project also contributes to our personal development.

Trip to Hyderabad
Visit to Crafts Museum
Indian Fashion Designers
Visit to Satya Jyoti
DLF Emporio
Our first days in Delhi
Traditional Dutch Costumes
"Fashion codes" of India
Aim of the project

About:

India has become a major player in the world of fashion and textiles over the last few years. The country is now the second largest cotton exporter of the world, after China. India is also known for its Crafts industry and is, besides that, a production country for many big fashion brands, for example Nike, GAP and H&M.

AMFI has several reasons for collaborating with India. First of all the school wants to bring its young fashion professionals in contact with the Indian way of working. This will help them in their future career to do business with and for India, either for an Indian or non-Indian fashion company.

Secondly, the fashion industry of India is for a big part based on tradition and heritage (especially the crafts industry). The Dutch students might bring this aspect back in the Dutch way of working, which can lead to innovation, inspiration and new ideas.

AMFI will research the role of tradition in India, what is the Indian perspective of the their own fashion industry? Is there a special need for them to work together with Dutch students and in which area?

The aim of AMFI is to establish a relevant, regular education program with the Pearl Academy (www.pearlacademy.com) and the Crafts industry for Dutch fashion students in India and the other way around. Important is that there will be an exchange of knowledge. Collaboration is a big advantage for Dutch students, but Indian students get the chance to learn from the Dutch students at the same time. It’s a win-win situation.

We as students are looking forward to this project. Besides all reasons mentioned above, the project also contributes to our personal development.

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